Skip To ContentSkip To Content

    WHAT KIND OF PROJECT SHOULD MY CHILD DO?

    Look online for suggestions. Think easy, < than an hour to do, and fun! Here is a link with some creative ideas: https://www.sciencebuddies.org/stem-activities Examples of Engineering and Scientific Design experiments described below:

     

    ENGINEERING DESIGN: BUILD SOMETHING TO TEST AN IDEA OR SOLVE A PROBLEM.

    Engineering Design Diagram

    1. ASK. Brainstorm problems you want to try to solve. You can start thinking of everyday problems you encounter, and possible solutions you could come up with to solve them. For example:
      • Plastic rings for 6-packs of soda are dangerous to animals in the environment. We need a better way to hold drinks together at the store that won’t harm animals in the environment.
      • It can be dangerous for people to jog at night because people can’t see them. We need something that will keep people seen and safe.
    2. IMAGINE. Brainstorm possible solutions and consider design options. Figure out how you will know if your solution solves the problem.
    3. PLAN. Choose the best design, draw a picture and identify the right materials.
    4. CREATE. Build your solution based on your drawings and test it!
    5. IMPROVE. Study how it worked, change the design to make it better and test again!
    6. When you’re done...Make a display! Show evidence of all of your steps: bring in what you built, pictures of you building it, drawings with labels, data tables from testing or anything else. The size limit is 3x4 feet. Clearly write your name and Room# on the back.

    SCIENTIFIC DESIGN:

    Scientific Method Diagram

    1. Make an Observation. What phenomenon do you notice in nature? What have you read about? What have you discussed in class?
    2. Ask a Question. Think of interesting questions. Why does this pattern occur? What happens if I change this one thing? Does this always happen? Examples might include:
      • How does the amount of sunlight a soybean plant gets each day affect its growth?
      • How does wrapping my drink in tin foil affect the temperature over time?
    3. Make a hypothesis. Predict what you think the answer will be. It’s okay if it ends up being wrong!
    4. Conduct an experiment using what you know about fair tests (controlled experiments). Write your procedure (with at least three trials) and run the trials. Gather data on each trial.
    5. Draw conclusions. Based on the data you gathered, what is the answer to your question? Make a claim and use evidence and reasoning.
    6. When you’re done...Make a display! Show evidence of all of your steps: bring in what you built, pictures of you building it, drawings with labels, data tables from testing or anything else. The size limit is 3x4 feet. Clearly write your name and Room# on the back.